Wednesday, August 31, 2011

‎5.1.4 To ensure safety, skaters may not use dangerous blocking techniques.

Today's rule is the start of a section that explains very basically the types of blocking that the rules consider dangerous. In the following days I will cover the subrules of 5.1.4 and explain their associated penalty sections. This rule simply explains that there are dangerous blocking techniques that may not be used, in the interest of skater safety.

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/246316275407236

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

‎2.3.2 There will be at least a five (5) minute break between periods to allow for referee rotation and, if applicable, skater warm-up

Friday’s rule explained that a roller derby game or bout is played in two 30 minute periods, while today’s rule explains that there must be at least 5 minutes in between the two periods. What it means about referee rotation is in regards to the Jammer referees, as it is common practice for the Jammer referees to switch teams at half time.

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/245823958789801

Monday, August 29, 2011

2.2.3 Two or more games may be combined in a single “double-header” event. Games can either be staggered by periods or played in full, one at a time depending upon the agreement between teams involved.

Like Friday’s rule, today’s rule, while not the most exciting rule, explains how games may be played in multi-bout events. This rule calls it a “double-header” but that would be what a multi-bout event is called if two games are played. It is common for leagues to call a multi-bout event of 3 or more games a “tournament”. While this is ok, in practice, being that these are the WFTDA rules, these events are considered multi-bout events by the rules. The official tournaments are the “Big 5” Regional tournaments and WFTDA Championships.

Another facet of this rule is that it allows periods of games to be staggered, meaning the first period of the first game is played, followed by the first period of the second game, then the second periods of the first and then second games. This is a practice I have never personally experienced, nor heard of happening.

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/245333995505464

Friday, August 26, 2011

2.2.1 A bout or game is composed of sixty (60) minutes of play divided into two periods of thirty (30) minutes played between two teams.

While not the most exciting rule, today's explains the length of a game and each period. The rules used to allow 3 twenty minute period, but were changed to only allow 2 thirty minute periods. From my own experience, this was a sensible change, as it keeps the game going longer and prevents an extra stoppage of play (2nd intermission).

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/243929615645902

Thursday, August 25, 2011

6.11.7 Any of the scenarios in Sections 6.11.1.1–6.11.1.4.

The final No Impact/No Penalty rule in the Cutting the Track section, today’s rule explains that any of the listed scenarios are to be considered no penalty. All of the scenarios listed are situations when the receiver of a block may return to the track in front of the initiator of the block. All these scenarios were covered here, and are available on the archive page.

http://www.rollerderbyruleoftheday.com/2011/07/61111-when-initiating-skater-is.html
http://www.rollerderbyruleoftheday.com/2011/07/61112-when-initiating-skater-goes-out.html
http://www.rollerderbyruleoftheday.com/2011/07/61113-when-initiating-skater-downs.html
http://www.rollerderbyruleoftheday.com/2011/07/61114-when-initiating-skater-exits.html

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/243369585701905

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

6.11.6 An out of bounds skater that steps one foot inside the track boundary to become a straddling skater and then steps back completely out of bounds, never removing her out of bounds contact with the floor.

One more No Impact/No Penalty rule from the Cutting the Track section, today’s rule explains there is no penalty if a skater who is out of bounds steps back on the track to become a straddling skater (meaning she is touching bout inside and outside the track boundary simultaneously with her skates) and then steps back completely out of bounds, she will not be penalized for Cutting the Track, even if she passed any number of in bounds skaters when she was straddling. She doesn’t get a CTT penalty because if she is straddling, and then completely out of bounds, she is never considered an in bounds skater, which is a requirement for a CTT penalty. Care must be taken to watch the skater’s skates, however, because straddling requires one skate in bounds, and one skate out of bounds. If the out of bounds skate is lifted at any point, and only the in bounds skate is on the floor, then that skater is considered in bounds, and will receive a Cutting penalty.

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/242882392417291

Tuesday, August 23, 2011

6.11.5 A skater straddling the track boundary line who then completely exits the track, regardless of which, or how many, skaters she has passed while straddling.

Continuing with the No Impact/No Penalty rules from the Cutting the Track section, today’s rule explain how to avoid a CTT penalty while straddling. According to this rule, if a straddling skater (a skater touching both inside and outside the track boundary simultaneously) passes any number of in bounds skaters and then ceases all in bounds contact, thus going completely out of bounds, they will not get a Cutting the Track penalty. People have asked how to avoid getting a CTT penalty while straddling, and this is one of the ways to do it.

It must be remembered, however, that unless a skater is blocked to a straddling position, or gets there as a result of a missed block, she will receive a Skating Out Of Bounds penalty as soon as she puts herself in a straddling position. This is because of the official WFTDA Rules Publication. Now, what also must be noted is that a skater gets a SOOB penalty when she puts herself into a straddling position or out of bounds. After that, if she cuts the track, that is a second action. So how the skater got to the straddling position is important, but what she does in regards to Cutting after that is a different action and must be looked at using different rules, such as today’s rule.

http://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/242391915799672

Monday, August 22, 2011

‎6.11.4 A skater who has re-entered the track in front of a skater who is “in the box,” having been sent off the track for a penalty.

Another rule from the No Impact/No penalty section of Cutting the Track, today’s rule explains that a skater who is considered “in the box” can’t be cut. What that means is that once a skater has been directed to the penalty, she is considered “in the box” (per 7.3.2.2.1) and is therefore not an in bounds, in play and upright skater, which are the only skaters around which other skaters may better their position. So, if a skater is out of bounds and returns in front of a skater who has already been directed to the box and is just leaving the track, there will be no penalty.

http://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/241811815857682

Sunday, August 21, 2011

6.11.3 A skater who has re-entered the track in front of a downed, out of bounds, or out-of-play skater is not bettering her position. However, such skaters are subject to cutting the track penalties for other in-play skaters and are still subject to skating out of bounds penalties.

Today’s rule explains that only in bounds skaters that are not down or out of play may be cut. That is, returning to the track in front of a down, out of bounds, or out of play skater is not considered Cutting the Track. This rule covers the situation that, in my experience, many skaters when receiving a Cutting the Track penalty. Most often the response I hear is “but she went down” or “she went out of bounds”. I always want to respond with “true she did, but the other 2 or 3 skaters you cut didn’t” (of course, as a ref, I don’t). As well, where the rule says that skaters are still subject to skating out of bounds penalties, if a skater skates out of bounds to avoid a fallen skater, they will not receive a penalty per 6.12.4.

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/241408059231391

Friday, August 19, 2011

6.11.2 Skaters straddling the track boundary line Skaters are straddling the track boundary line when they are simultaneously touching both inside and outside the track boundary line. Straddling skaters are subject to cutting the track penalties when they are in bounds, upright and skating. The boundary line is considered in bounds. … (cont.)

The rest of the rule reads:

… Airborne skaters are not considered straddling skaters. (See Section 6.8.9 for the in bounds/out of bounds status of airborne skaters.)

Straddling was something in the rules, but not specifically defined until Version 4.0 of the WFTDA rule set. 4.0 added this rule to make it clear that straddling skaters may be guilty of Cutting the Track. Further, this rule makes the distinction between straddling skaters and airborne skaters. Airborne skaters are covered in the Out Of Bounds Blocking section, as they are not considered straddling skaters, per today’s rule. Several other subrules to the Cutting the Track section were also added along with this rule to cover CTT penalties for straddling skaters.

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/240420322663498

Thursday, August 18, 2011

6.11 Cutting the Track A skater that is in bounds need not yield the right of way to an out of bounds skater. Skaters that are out of bounds must find an entrance back in bounds that does not require in bounds skaters to move. When out of bounds, skaters must re-enter the track without bettering their position in relation to other skaters. … (cont.)

Today’s rule is Cutting the Track. This is the first rule in the CTT section, but it is quite large, so I will post the rule in its entirety:

“A skater that is in bounds need not yield the right of way to an out of bounds skater. Skaters that are out of bounds must find an entrance back in bounds that does not require in bounds skaters to move. When out of bounds, skaters must re-enter the track without bettering their position in relation to other skaters. Out of bounds skaters are subject to skating out of bounds penalties even if they do not cut the track (see Section 6.12 Skating Out of Bounds).

This section addresses penalties for cutting the track. Skaters must be upright and skating to receive cutting the track penalties. (See Section 6.8 Out of Bounds Blocking for downed skaters re-entering and illegally blocking and Section 6.3 Low Blocking).

Downed skaters that have re-entered the track are subject to applicable cutting the track penalties when they return to an in-bounds, upright and skating position. Downed skaters are not to be penalized with cutting the track penalties, but are still subject to low blocking and blocking from out of bounds penalties. Skaters cannot drop back while in play in efforts to undo or avoid cutting the track penalties.”

This is a very extensive rule that explains all the basics behind not just Cutting the Track, but reentering the track in general. Let’s look at each part. For starters, this rule explains that in bounds skaters need not yield the right of way to out of bounds skaters. What this means is that being in bounds is an advantage and being out of bounds is a disadvantage. The rule goes on to explain that skaters out of bounds must find an entrance back in bounds without requiring an in bounds skater to move. That is part of the disadvantage. If an out of bounds skater returns to the track in front of an in bounds skater who was in front of her when she went out of bounds, that would be what is considered bettering her position in relation to other skaters on the track. Bettering her position negates the disadvantage, which is what the out of bounds skater may not do. So the very basics of Cutting the Track is that out of bounds skaters are disadvantaged by their position out of bounds, and must return to the track without negating that disadvantage by bettering her position when she returns.

The rule continues to explain that for a skater to be guilty of CTT she must be in bounds and in an upright and skating position. That means that a skater who goes out of bounds and returns to the track while down does not get a CTT penalty. Up until Version 4.0 of the WFTDA rule this requirement didn’t exist. 4.0 changed the rule, which penalized a skater even if their pinky finger were to cross back on the line after the went out of bounds. This was a great change, as it prevents skaters from getting CTT penalties when they are trying to not go back in bounds, and also makes it easier for us refs as we only have to worry about skaters in an upright and skating position, where Cutting is concerned. It is also important to note the “in bounds” requirement of the rule. If a skater still has any part of her body or equipment touching out of bounds when she returns, then she is not in bounds, and will not receive a CTT penalty. So if a skater returns to the track and betters her position, but is down, and then goes back out bounds while still down, she will not receive a Cutting penalty. If, however, she returns to the track in front of one or more in bounds skaters and better her position, but is still down, and while still in front of those other skaters she gets up and returns to an upright and skating position, she will then receive a Cutting the Track penalty.

What this rule also covers is skaters who return to the track that are down, who don’t receive Cutting penalties. It goes on to say that skaters returning who are down won’t receive a Cutting penalty but are still eligible for Out Of Bounds Blocking or Low Blocking penalties if they make contact with opponents. Therefore, skaters who return to the track while down still need to be responsible for their actions so they don’t get any penalty.

Finally, today’s rule explains that a Cutting the Track penalty can’t be “undone”. This means that once a skater has cut the track and received a penalty for it, leaving the track again and returning behind the skater who was cut doesn’t remove the penalty. Once a cut has been made and a penalty given, it stays.

There are many more subrules in Section 6.11, some that have been covered here, and some that have yet to be covered but will be in the future. For those that have been covered, please see the Roller Derby Rule of the Day archive page at www.rollerderbyruleoftheday.com.

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/239899749382222

Wednesday, August 17, 2011

2.1.3.1 The track must clearly demarcate the Pivot and Jammer start lines. These lines must be consistent in color throughout the length and width of the line and must be at least one (1) inch and no greater than three (3) inches in width. Sponsor logos are permitted on the Pivot and Jammer Lines as long as the logo does not interfere with the contrast of the line to the skating surface.

Just like the track boundaries, today’s rules explains that the minimum and maximum widths of the Pivot and Jammer lines are 1 and 3 inches. Similarly, they, too, must be consistent in width for the length of the line. This rule also includes a requirement for the Pivot and Jammer lines to be clearly contrasted to the skating surface, even if they have sponsor logos on them. I have personally never seen a sponsor logo on a Pivot or Jammer line, but I can imagine how they may make the Pivot or Jammer lines difficult to see on the track surface if they aren’t high contrast.

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/239425146096349

Monday, August 15, 2011

4.1.1.2 Proximity is defined as not more than ten feet (as measured from the hips) in front of or behind the nearest pack skater.

Today’s rule deal with how to determine which skaters are in the pack. As a reminder, the pack is defined as:

4.1.1 The pack is defined by the largest group of in bounds Blockers, skating in proximity, containing members from both teams.

So the rule that defines the pack uses the word proximity. Today’s rule explains just what proximity is. Until version 4.0 of the WFTDA rules, this rule used to define proximity as within two strides (or ten feet). In version 4.0 it was changed to just ten feet. The rules now clearly define that skaters within ten feet of others, so long as they form the largest group of skaters containing members of both teams.

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/238374342868096

Sunday, August 14, 2011

‎2.7.1 Benches or seats must be provided to make up the “Penalty Box.” This is the designated area where penalty time will be served. The benches or seats must be capable of accommodating a total of six players (three from each team).

Today’s rule explains how to make up the penalty box. It must be noticed that six seats are required to make up the box. This allows for two Blockers from each team to sit in the box, as well as one Jammer from each team. A seat for each Jammer is required so that one may sit and release the other, and also in the case that both arrive at the same time they may sit in the box together.

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/237940919578105

Friday, August 12, 2011

‎2.3.1 The period begins when the designated Official blows the first jam whistle. The signal will be one long whistle blast.

This is a pretty simple and straightforward rule that explains when the period, and thus the period clock, begins. In most cases, and certainly any WFTDA regulation and sanctioned games, the designated Official is the Jam Timer. However, in other games, another Official may be designated to start the jam, and even possibly another to start the Jammers. Thus, the rules don’t specify that the Jam Timer must start the period.

The signal of one long whistle blast is due to the fact that a jam starting whistle, according to 2.9 Whistles, is one long whistle blast.

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/237007859671411

Thursday, August 11, 2011

‎2.1.1 For regulation inter-league games, the track shall be based on the specifications in Appendix B - WFTDA Track Design. The method of marking dimensions (tape, rope, etc), including suggested ten (10) foot marks, are subject to the restrictions of the venue; however, the track must be the standardized dimensions.

For interleague games to be considered regulation, the track must meet the specs in Appendix B, but also follow all the other rules in Section 2.1. Appendix B explains, step by step, how to lay a regulation size track, including inside and outside track boundaries, and suggested 10 foot marks. What Appendix B doesn’t include is the 10 foot safety clearance:

2.1.5 There will be a ten (10) foot clearance around the outside of the track for safety. If there is a rail, wall, or barrier between the track and the crowd that completely prevents contact between spectators and contestants, a five (5) foot clearance is permissible. Referees may skate in this area, and/or the infield of the track. The clearance cannot be less than five (5) feet.

If a venue restricts the size of the 10 foot clearance, without allowing for a smaller clearance per 2.1.5, then as long as the track is the same size play should be just fine. However, a bout will not be considered regulation or sanctioned without a properly sized track with properly sized safety clearance.

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/236582486380615

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

8.1 Only skaters wearing the designated Jammer’s star helmet cover with visible stars are eligible to accrue points.

Simple, yet complex. Yes, only a skater wearing the Jammer helmet cover is eligible to accrue points. However, just because a skater is wearing the Jammer helmet cover does not necessarily mean she is the Jammer, not is she legally allowed to be wearing it. If two skaters from one team start a jam with Jammer helmet covers on, they don’t both get to score points. Similarly, if a Jammer has passed her helmet cover to her Pivot, and then gets sent to the box before the Pivot has put on the helmet cover, the Pivot does not get to score points if she puts on the Jammer helmet cover with the Jammer in the penalty box.

This rule was included in version 2.1 of the WFTDA rules before the concept of an active or inactive Jammer was added. This rule made it clear that a Jammer must be wearing her helmet cover or else she would not score points for passing opponents.

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/236111509761046

Sunday, August 7, 2011

‎3.5.6 Once Jammer status is transferred, it cannot be transferred back to the original Jammer.

While the basis of this rule is explained in a couple other parts of the Star Pass section, today's rule makes it abundantly clear that the Jammer status can't be transferred twice in one jam. This is because the star may only be passed to the Pivot. After a successful star pass the Pivot has become the Jammer and the Jammer has become a non-Pivot Blocker. So there is no longer anyone to pass the star to.

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/234611046577759

Thursday, August 4, 2011

‎3.5.4 Pass Procedure In order to transfer the Jammer position to the Pivot, a Jammer must remove her helmet cover and hand it to her team’s Pivot. The helmet cover may not be handed off via other skaters or thrown. The helmet cover may not be taken off the Jammer’s head by the Pivot or another skater. A Jammer who has removed her helmet cover has forfeited:

Today’s rule explains the basics of how a Star Pass is supposed to happen. The basic procedure is that the Jammer must remove her helmet cover herself, then hand it directly to the Pivot, and then Pivot puts the helmet cover on her helmet. The rule explains that the Jammer helmet may not be removed by anyone other than the Jammer herself. If it is, that would be a violation of the Star Pass procedure, and be penalized per 6.13.20, if it was removed by an teammate. It the helmet cover was removed by an opponent they will penalized for a High Block per 6.2.3 or possibly be expelled for a High Block per 6.2.5 or 6.2.6. The rule goes on to explain that the helmet cover must be handed directly to the Pivot. This is only partially true. Certainly, one of the legal ways to transfer the helmet cover is for the Jammer to hand it right to the Pivot. However, the rules say that the Pivot may recover a dropped helmet cover, thus making that another legal way for the helmet cover to be transferred. The more important part of this rule is that the helmet cover may not be thrown to the Pivot, or passed to her by other players. If the helmet cover were thrown to the Pivot, or a teammate were to hand the helmet cover to the Pivot, that would also be a violation of the Star Pass procedure.

Finally, the rule explains that when a Jammer removes her helmet cover, she forfeits:

3.5.4.1 Her ability to accrue points, unless she returns the helmet cover to her head with visible stars.
3.5.4.2 Her Lead Jammer status.

As always, a Jammer with her helmet cover off is considered inactive, and thus may not score points or be Lead Jammer.

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/233171103388420

Wednesday, August 3, 2011

3.5.2 The star may only be transferred to a Pivot who is in play.

While yesterday’s rule required the star pass to happen in the Engagement Zone, making this rule seem redundant, today’s rule makes it illegal for a Pivot to receive a star pass while down, which would make her out of play. Like yesterday’s rule, this also makes it illegal for a Pivot to receive a star pass while out of bounds or out of the Engagement Zone as well.

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/232691926769671

Tuesday, August 2, 2011

‎3.5.1 The star may be transferred by either Jammer while in the Engagement Zone. Jammers and pivots must be within the Engagement Zone play to pass the star.

The first rule of Star Passes is that the Jammer and Pivot must both be in the Engagement Zone for the pass to be legal. That being said, there has been discussion in the past over whether this rule mean the entire Star Pass procedure (Jammer removing helmet cover, passing to Pivot, Pivot putting it on her head) must happen within the Engagement Zone or just the actual transfer of the helmet cover. Luckily, the WFTDA released a Q&A Entry that covers this exact question.

http://wftda.com/rules/qa/​star-passes-and-the-engage​ment-zone

According to the WFTDA only the actual transfer of the helmet cover must happen while in the Engagement Zone. The Q&A says that the Pivot may put on the helmet cover outside of the Engagement Zone but is still able to receive Out Of Play penalties until she has become the Jammer. This also means a Pivot may put on the Jammer helmet cover while out of bounds. The requirement for only the transfer to happen while in the Engagement Zone means that if the Jammer hands the helmet cover directly to the Pivot then it must happen in the EZ, but if the transfer is a result of the Pivot picking up the helmet cover from the floor, she must do so while in the EZ. If the Jammer drops her helmet cover out of bounds, the Pivot may not pick it up from there and put it on her helmet, as out of bounds is not in the Engagement Zone.

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/232222230149974

Monday, August 1, 2011

3.5 Passing the Star A Jammer may transfer her position to her team’s Pivot, allowing said Pivot to become the point-scoring skater for her team for the remainder of the jam. This is commonly referred to as “Passing the Star.” Only the position of Jammer, and not the status of Lead Jammer, may be transferred to a Pivot Blocker. … (cont.)

Star pass week! Here’s the full text of today’s rule:

3.5 Passing the Star
A Jammer may transfer her position to her team’s Pivot, allowing said Pivot to become the point-scoring skater for her team for the remainder of the jam. This is commonly referred to as “Passing the Star.” Only the position of Jammer, and not the status of Lead Jammer, may be transferred to a Pivot Blocker. If the Jammer that “passes the star” to her Pivot was Lead Jammer, that status is automatically forfeited and there is no Lead Jammer for the remainder of the jam. It is illegal to transfer the star outside of the Engagement Zone. A Pivot cannot be Lead Jammer. The position of Pivot cannot be transferred by passing the Pivot helmet cover. Violations of these outlined procedures merit Illegal Procedure penalties, as described in Section 6.13 - Illegal Procedures, to be assessed against the skater responsible for the violation.

This is the first part of the Star Pass section of the rules. It explains the concept of a star pass, which is a strategical move that transfers the position of Jammer from the Jammer to the Pivot. This rule explains many things. The first point is that the Jammer may transfer her position to her team’s Pivot, who then becomes the point-scorer for the remainder of the jam. Next, the rule explains how the status of Lead Jammer is never transferred to the Pivot. While it explains in this rule that when the Jammer passes the star the status of Lead Jammer is automatically forfeited. While that may be included in this rule, even in an unsuccessful star pass attempt the status of Lead Jammer is forfeited when the Jammer removes her helmet cover, per 3.5.4.2. The rule goes on to say that if the Jammer who passed the star was Lead Jammer, then once the status of Lead is forfeited there will be no Lead Jammer for the rest of the jam and it will go the full two minutes. The next point of the rule explains that a Pivot cannot be Lead Jammer. This may seem confusing, since Lead Jammer is a Jammer, not a Pivot. This point helps reiterate that Lead Jammer status can’t be transferred to the Pivot, but it also explains that a Pivot who has been passed the star and become Jammer can’t become Lead Jammer if it wasn’t already earned by the original Jammer. Put another way, the skater who begins the jam as Pivot may never at any point in that jam become Lead Jammer. Finally, this rule goes on to explain that any violations of the star pass procedure, which follow in Section 3.5, some of which will be covered here this week, will result in Illegal Procedure penalties.

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/231770910195106