Tuesday, September 25, 2012

6.13.17 Forcing a jam to be called off due to too many skaters on the track. The penalty is issued to the Pivot in that jam. If there is no Pivot in that jam, the penalty is issued to the last Non-Pivot Blocker to enter the track to the extent that the referee is able to determine who that skater was. If there is no Pivot in the jam and the referee is unable to determine the last skater to enter the track, the referee issuing the illegal procedure must penalize the Blocker on the track closest to the referee who calls the penalty.

Similar to yesterday’s rule, today’s rule comes from the Illegal Procedures section. This is a major penalty. Yesterday I explained that a minor penalty is given to an extra skater if a jam begins with too many skaters from one team on the track. Sometimes, however, a jam goes on for some time without the referees noticing that there is an extra skater on the track, and by the time they go to remove the extra skater, it becomes difficult to remove a skater from the track. This may be because of other penalties happening, noise, or skaters not listening. Thus, in some cases the jam may be called off by the referees so that it doesn’t continue with one team being advantaged by an extra skater. If the jam is called off because there are too many skaters on the track, then the team with an too many skaters will receive a penalty. If both teams have too many skaters, both teams will receive a penalty. By default this major penalty goes to the team’s pivot, if there is a pivot in the jam. If the team did not field a pivot in that jam, then the referees should attempt to identify the last skater to enter the track, as she would be considered the extra skater. If the last skater to enter the track is unable to be identified, then the major penalty will go given to the block on the track that is closest to the referee issuing the penalty. This may seem odd, but is worded in such a way as to avoid referees just choosing a skater to issue the penalty to. The wording “the Blocker on the track closest to the referee who calls the penalty” make it pretty unambiguous, and helps relieve the possibility of bias.

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/450458828326312

Thursday, September 13, 2012

4.3.2.5 Skaters may not assist teammates outside the Engagement Zone.

Today’s rule comes from the Jam Positioning section. There’s not very much to it. If a skater is out of the engagement zone, she may not give or receive an assist. Both teammates involved in an assist must be in the engagement zone or else they will be given an Out of Play penalty.

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/446164535422408

Wednesday, September 12, 2012

4.3.2.4 Skaters may assist downed teammates within the Engagement Zone.

Today’s rule comes from the Jam Positioning section of the rules. While rule 6.9.2.1 allows a stopped or counterclockwise skating skater to assist a downed teammate, this rule requires that the assist happen in the engagement zone. Simple as that.

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/445848538787341

Saturday, September 8, 2012

3.5.9.4 A Jammer who successfully completes a helmet cover transfer to her Pivot will play the position of Blocker for the remainder of the jam.

When a legal star pass has been completed, meaning a pivot has put the jammer helmet cover on her helmet, the jammer who passed the star is no longer a jammer. She becomes a non-pivot blocker for the rest of that jam. She must follow all of the rules that apply to non-pivot blockers, which means, for example, she may no longer engage the opposing jammer outside of the engagement zone, as that is illegal for blockers. It is imperative to note that the jammer does not switch positions with the pivot in a star pass. This means the jammer does NOT become the pivot when the pivot becomes the jammer. As mentioned in the first paragraph of Section 3.5, “The position of Pivot cannot be transferred by passing the Pivot helmet cover”. Only the jammer position may be transferred. That is why the jammer becomes a non-pivot blocker, and not the pivot.

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/444403358931859

Friday, September 7, 2012

3.5.9.3 A Pivot who has taken the position of Jammer for her team by means of a successful helmet cover transfer will play the position of Jammer for the remainder of the jam.

When a legal star pass has been completed, meaning a pivot has put the jammer helmet cover on her helmet, she has become the jammer and will remain her team's hammer until the end of the jam. She may not pass the star to anyone. Her team's jammer referee will begin following her. As well, any penalties that would typically be issued to the pivot by default would no longer apply to her. Granted, most penalties that go to the pivot happen at the the beginning of a jam, but for example if, after a star pass has been completed, the jam is called off for that team having too many skaters on the track, there would be no pivot to issue the penalty to.

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/444076245631237

Thursday, September 6, 2012

3.5.9.2 A Pivot who has been passed the star and has become the Jammer is now subject to all rules per Section 8 Scoring. She picks up where the previous Jammer left off on points scored and number of laps through the pack. The helmet cover must be on the new Jammer’s helmet and the stars must be visible in order for the new Jammer to accrue points.

Today's rule comes from the Pass Completion part of the Star Pass section of the rules. This rule explains that once a pivot has become the jammer through a legal star pass, she is eligible to start scoring. She continues scoring where the previous jammer left off. That means, if the original jammer passed two opposing blockers and then passed the star, the new jammer would have two points when she became the jammer and would be able to score the last two opposing blocker points on that scoring pass. Another scoring situation, if the original jammer were about to lap the opposing jammer but passed the star first, then the new jammer would be able to pass the opposing jammer and score that jammer lap point. Some may argue that she wouldn't score that point since the new jammer hasn't technically lapped the opposing jammer yet. However, this rule clearly states that the new jammer "picks up where the previous Jammer left off on points scored and number of laps through the pack". So, if the original jammer were a lap ahead of the opposing jammer, then the new jammer would be as well. Of course, the same applies if the opposing jammer were the one about to score the jammer lap point.

The last part of the rule is just a reminder that to be able to score points once she becomes the jammer, the pivot must make sure she is active when the pass is complete by putting on the jammer helmet cover with the stars visible. If the pivot puts on the jammer helmet cover without the stars being visible, she will still become the jammer but will not be considered active and this will not be able to score points. If this happens she may remove the helmet cover and replace it on her helmet with the stars visible.

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/443702659001929

Tuesday, September 4, 2012

3.5.9.1 A Pivot who has been passed the star attains Jammer status when she has the helmet cover on her helmet. Until the Jammer cover is on, she is subject to out of play penalties.

From the Pass Completion part of the Star Pass section, today’s rule explains how a star pass is completed. In a legal star pass, the position of jammer is transferred to the pivot when the pivot puts the jammer helmet cover on her helmet. While this is pretty simple at base, there’s some depth to this rule.

The rule says that the pivot becomes the jammer when she has the jammer helmet cover “on her helmet”. It does not say that the jammer helmet cover must go on top of the pivot helmet cover. As well, 3.6.6 allows a pivot to start the jam with the pivot helmet cover in her hand, but no rule requires her to put it on to become active. Thus, as long as the pivot begins the jam with the pivot helmet cover on her helmet or in her hand at the start of the jam, she is still the pivot without the helmet cover on. So, if the pivot isn’t wearing the pivot helmet cover and puts on the jammer helmet cover (likely because she took off the pivot helmet cover first) she is still legally allowed to do so, and will become the jammer.

To reiterate, it is not illegal for the pivot to remove the pivot helmet cover before she puts on the jammer helmet cover. The pivot just needs to put the jammer helmet cover on her helmet to become the jammer. Of course, if the jammer is penalized before she can do so, then she will not become the jammer, and will be instructed to take off the jammer helmet cover.

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/443012265737635

Monday, September 3, 2012

3.5.8.1.1 The Pivot is eligible to obtain Jammer status by retrieving a dropped helmet cover and placing it on her helmet.

Today's rule follows yesterday's rule. That rule explained that the jammer or pivot may retrieve a dropped helmet cover.It did not specify which helmet cover, which means that the pivot may retrieve a dropped helmet cover from the ground. That leads in to today's rule. If the jammer helmet cover falls to the ground, the pivot may pick it up, put it on her head, and become the jammer. There are many facets tot his rule. I will try to cover them all.

Although 3.5.4 says that the jammer must hand off the helmet cover to the pivot and not throw it, because of this rule if a jammer throws the helmet cover and it lands on the floor, and the pivot picks it up, then she has retrieved a fallen helmet cover and may put it on. The reasoning behind this, for those not convinced, is because a helmet cover thrown to the ground is not a helmet cover thrown to the pivot.

Another situation is a helmet cover dropped out of bounds. The pivot may skate out of bounds to retrieve a dropped helmet cover (per 3.5.8.2) and become the jammer. Of course, if the helmet cover was dropped by the jammer while she was on her way to the penalty box, the pivot may retrieve it, but not put it on, as the position of jammer is in the penalty box with the inactive jammer sitting there. Howeber, once the jammer is released from the penalty box, the pivot may put on the helmet cover and become the jammer.

There is a situation which seems against the rules to some, however is actually legal. That is where the jammer drops the helmet cover on the ground while she is out of the engagement zone and the pivot picks it up when she gets to it. It is often argued that this type of star pass is illegal because it wasn't made while in the engagement zone. Passes that must be made in the engagement zone are passes where the helmet cover is handed directly from jammer to pivot, as outlined in 3.5.4. However, there is no rule that requires the jammer to be in the engagement zone when she drops a helmet cover, nor that the pivot must be in the engagement zone when she retrieves it. In fact, 3.5.8.2 is very specific that a helmet cover may retrieved while not in the engagement zone, since out of bounds is out of play.

To reiterate, it is not illegal for a pivot to retrieve a helmet cover from the ground an put it on her head. During yesterday's discussion, and also several times in the past, I've been told by various skaters that they have received penalties for just that action. If you have received a penalty for this, or know of a ref who has issued a penalty for this, please pass this information on the that referee. It is important that it is understood by all refs that this action is not illegal.

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/442675485771313

Sunday, September 2, 2012

3.5.8.1 If a helmet cover falls to the ground, or is removed from play by any means, it may only be recovered by the Jammer or Pivot.

Today’s rule is from the Incomplete Star Passes and Recovery part of the Star Pass section of the rules. There are times when, during a star pass, the jammer helmet cover is dropped, either by the jammer while attempting to hand it to the pivot, by the pivot while putting it on her helmet, or any of a number of other reasons. This rule allows the jammer or the pivot to recover a dropped helmet cover. Considering this rule says “a helmet cover” and doesn’t specify which, that means the pivot or the jammer may retrieve a dropped pivot or jammer helmet cover. Of course, if the jammer retrieves the pivot helmet cover she is not allowed to put it on her head, since the position of pivot may not be passed (per 3.5). As well, if the star pass has already been complete, and the original jammer is now playing the remainder of the jam as a non-pivot blocker (per 3.5.9.4), then she may not retrieve a helmet cover, as she is no longer pivot or jammer.

There is something else to note regarding this rule. If a helmet cover is being retrieved, a skater must do so only in a normal counterclockwise direction. Skating clockwise to retrieve a helmet cover is not allowed (per 3.5.8.2). It has been suggested that skating clockwise past the helmet, turning around, and then skating clockwise while retrieving the helmet cover ought to be legal. It isn’t. That is because the intent of the clockwise movement is to retrieve the helmet cover, even if the helmet cover was retrieved while moving counterclockwise.

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/442143709157824