Monday, January 27, 2014

3.7.2 The team Captain must visibly display a “C” on their uniform or arm. The team Captain’s Designated Alternate must visibly display an “A” on their clothing, uniform, or arm.

Today’s rule comes from the Uniforms part of the Skater Positions and Identification section. This is one of the easiest rules to follow. The captain of each team must have a “C” on their uniform or arm. This means they can have it written on their jersey with marker, a patch sewn on, vinyl pressed on, printed directly, etc. If it is displayed visibly (and not susceptible to falling off) then it is good to go. They may also put it on their arm, by writing on their arm with marker, putting it on an armband, or other ways. The designate alternate may do the exact same things, however, they get the option of putting the “A” on their clothing, since the designated alternate may be one of the team’s non-skating bench staff, while the captain must be a skater, which means they are required to wear a uniform (per 3.7.1).

As easy as this rule is to follow, there are still a couple of things to note. For starters, if a skater is putting a “C” or “A” on their arm, it should not be near enough their skater number, if their skater number is on their arm as well, so as not to be confused as part of their number. For example, if a skater is number 123, their arm shouldn’t look like their number is C123 or A123. Preferably, the “C” or “A” is placed above or below the skater’s number. If the number is placed on a skater’s uniform, it should not be affixed with tape, or be made of tape affixed to the uniform, for the very same reason that 3.7.1.1 doesn’t allow tape to be used for skater numbers on jerseys; tape falls off easily, especially when skaters sweat during a game. While not using tape for the “C” or “A” isn’t technically a rule, if it falls off a skater’s uniform, then it is no longer visibly displayed, and that skater may no longer act as captain or designated alternate.

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/665449810160545?stream_ref=10

Friday, January 24, 2014

7.2.2 Major penalties expire after one (1) minute served in the penalty box.

Today’s rule comes from the Penalty Enforcement Procedures section. It’s a pretty simple rule, right? Absolutely. Of course, jammer penalties may be shorter than one minute. Whether they expire earlier than one minute, or a jammer’s time in the box is simply shorter than their one minute penalty is debatable and, frankly, unimportant. Blockers must sit for the full minute of the penalty and are released when their time expires. Jammers must sit for the full minute of their penalty unless released from the penalty box early due to the opposing jammer sitting down in the box. Of course, there’s also the situation where a jammer will be released immediately after they sit down if the opposing jammer is already in the penalty box and has more than a minute of penalty time left.

There are diagrams to help understand the shortened jammer penalty times in the Photos section of the RDRotD Facebook page.

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/664110106961182?stream_ref=10

Friday, January 17, 2014

3.7.4.1 The print of the number must be at least 4 inches (10 cm) tall so that it is legible and large enough to be read by officials who are positioned anywhere within the track or on its boundary.

Today’s rule comes from the Uniforms section of the rules. This rule is well known to (nearly) every roller derby player, however a small change with big implications was made in the most recent version of the rules. Previously, this rule said that a skater’s number on the back of their uniform “should” be at least 4 inches tall. Now this rule says the number “must” be at least 4 inches tall. Simply put, there’s no lack of clarity in this rule now. If a skater doesn’t have their number on the back of their jersey in at least 4 inch high characters, then it will be considered not legal per the rules.

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/660857473953112

Thursday, January 16, 2014

6.10.6.1 A skater ahead of the Engagement Zone is compelled to skate clockwise to return to the Engagement Zone if the pack is stopped or moving clockwise.

Today's rule comes from the Out Of Play section. It has become common enough knowledge that skating clockwise is not inherently illegal in the sport of roller derby. There are specific actions that a skater may not do while skating clockwise, but otherwise it is legal to do so. As well, it became common knowledge that the rules did not ever compel a skater to skate clockwise. This was true up until the WFTDA released an Official Q&A on the topic, which has since been incorporated into the rules, as of the most recent version. This rule explains the two situations in which a skater would be required to skate in the clockwise direction. Both involve a skater that is out of the engagement zone ahead of the pack. If a blocker is situated outside of the engagement zone ahead of the pack, and 1) the pack is moving clockwise, or 2) the pack is stopped, then that blocker is compelled to skate clockwise to return to the engagement zone. If the pack is moving counterclockwise, then even by standing still that blocker is making an attempt to reenter the engagement zone, because at some point the edge of the EZ will reach them. However, with a stopped pack the out of play blocker will remain out of play until the pack moves counterclockwise again. And with the a clockwise moving pack, the out of play blocker will just become even further out of play, to the point where the pack may even lap that blocker in the clockwise direction. Since blockers are required to attempt to reenter the engagement zone immediately after going out of play, these two situations require a blocker to skate clockwise to make that attempt.

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/660467523992107?stream_ref=10

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

6.10.2.3.2 A pack being destroyed as the result of a missed block. This is not the same as intentionally skating out of bounds to destroy a pack, which should be penalized according to rule 6.10.2.1.

Today's rule comes from the Out Of Play section. It is a subrule of 6.10.2.3 which explains that there are actions which are considered part of normal gameplay, and if the pack is destroyed as a result of these actions, no penalty will be issued. The first of these actions is the pack being destroyed by a skater forcing an opponent down or out of bounds.

This action happens quite often. A skater goes for a block, and ends up whiffing and flying up out of bounds. There is a rule in the Skating Out Of Bounds section that allows for this action without a penalty. However, in the case where this action happens, and the pack is destroyed as a result, today’s rule allows for no pack destruction penalty to be issued. An example of a situation where this might happen is if one black blocker is skating in a pack with all the pink blockers, with the rest of the black blockers more than ten feet away, and then that lone black blocker goes for a block and misses, ending up out of bounds. The pack would then be destroyed, however no destruction penalty would be given.

As the rule says, this exception applies only to when the pack is destroyed as the result of a missed block. If a skater skates out of bounds to intentionally destroy the pack, then that skater will receive a penalty for illegally destroying the pack. If a skater appears to have gone out of bounds as the result of a missed block, but a referee determines that their intent was to skate out of bounds to destroy the pack, that skater may receive a penalty. After all, since intent must be judged to properly issue a penalty for intentionally skating out of bounds to destroy the pack, referees must judge their intent.

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/657041814334678?stream_ref=10

Monday, January 6, 2014

6.10.2.3.1 Forcing an opponent down or out of bounds.

Today's rule comes from the Out Of Play section. It is a subrule of 6.10.2.3 which explains that there are actions which are considered part of normal gameplay, and if the pack is destroyed as a result of these actions, no penalty will be issued. The first of these actions is the pack being destroyed by a skater forcing an opponent down or out of bounds.

This action is common when a team is goating a skater; which means they are holding an opposing blocker behind their wall, while the other opposing blockers are ahead. If the group of opposing blockers is more than 10 feet ahead of the wall with the goat, then the wall with the goated skater will be considered the pack. If the goated skater is blocked down or out of bounds, then there would be no pack. If that happens, then no penalty is to be issued, since blocking opposing skaters is a normal part of gameplay. When the pack is destroyed, both teams are responsible for reforming the pack, and must attempt to do so or else earn failure to reform penalties. However, no illegal destruction penalties would be issued for that pack destruction.

This rule, however, only mentions forcing an opponent out of bounds, not forcing a teammate down. Of course, a skater intentionally destroying the pack may result in a penalty if the intentional destruction meets the criteria for illegal destruction. Therefore, if a skater accidentally knocks down a teammate and the pack is destroyed, they may not receive a destruction penalty. But if a skater knocks down a teammate intentionally to destroy the pack - something left to the judgment of the referees - then they may receive a destruction penalty.

https://www.facebook.com/RollerDerbyRuleoftheDay/posts/656138597758333